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The ExoDyne Electric was hand built in a garage by a veterinary orthopaedic surgeon over a period of nine months.

Atlanta-based veterinary orthopaedic surgeon Alan Cross has a rather unusual pastime: building radical, one-off motorcycles. Cross holds an engineering degree and is a self-taught fabricator, able to shape metal how he pleases without resorting to much help. Cross has previously built outrageous concepts like electric drift trikes and steampunk floor lamps to widespread praise.

His latest build, the ExoDyne Electric bike took him nine months of spare evenings and weekends to complete. Cross retrofitted forks from a 2005 Suzuki RMZ 250 and the headstock and swingarm of a 1995 Suzuki RM 125 on the ExoDyne. The boxy main frame houses 48 lithium-ion polymer batteries. Another special feature of the battery box is its position. The box is linked to the headstock at one end and the swingarm pivot on the other. This arrangement is seen as ideal and most stable by engineers.

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The batteries use a polymer electrolyte instead of a more conventional liquid electrolyte. These are restricted to produce a combined 200A output. A 11kW (15 hp) EnerTrac Motor is built into the rear hub of the bike, which can propel the ExoDyne to speeds of up to 100 kph. The motor is capable of producing peak power of 30kW (41 hp).

Cross himself fabricated the entire spidery frame in the garage. To keep weight in check, a mix of aluminium, carbon-fibre, and titanium components are used. The final avatar of ExoDyne tips the scales at just 112.5 kg. Final touches like seat upholstery and powder coating the frame were outsourced to experts

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A small CycleAnalyst gadget mounted on the top clamp displays speed, amperage and range of the bike. The eBike doesn’t go too far on a single charge. Currently, it manages about 30 km before needing a full recharge.

Alan Cross has come up with a bespoke masterpiece after nine months of research, design, sourcing and fabrication. He’s selling the ExoDyne project to fund his next venture. If he keeps churning out such brilliant machines all by himself, we can hardly wait to see when he reveals his next big build.

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Source: Silodrome